River of Enterprise: The Commercial Origins of Regional by Kim M. Gruenwald

By Kim M. Gruenwald

"Gruenwald's publication will make a similar contribution to ancient wisdom of the Ohio Valley as Lewis Atherton's Frontier service provider did for our figuring out of the mercantile Midwest within the mid-nineteenth century.... a finely crafted narrative that we could the reader needless to say the Ohio River consistently served extra as an artery, that's, a river of trade, than a dividing line or boundary." -- R. Douglas damage, writer of The Ohio FrontierRiver of firm explores the position the Ohio performed in the lives of 3 generations of settlers from the river's headwaters at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to the falls at Louisville, Kentucky. half One examines the thoughts of colonists who coveted lands "Across the Mountains" as area to be conquered. half strains the emergence of a brand new zone in a valley remodeled through trade because the Ohio River turned the artery of circulation in "the Western Country." half 3 finds how kin among acquaintances around the river cooled as citizens of "the Buckeye nation" got here to treat the river because the boundary among North and South. From 1790 to 1830, the Ohio River nurtured a neighborhood identification as american citizens strove to create an empire in accordance with the binds of trade in frontier Ohio and Kentucky, and the backcountry of Pennsylvania and Virginia. The ebook reports the neighborhood, neighborhood, and nationwide connections created by way of retailers by way of tracing the enterprise global of the Woodbridge kin of Marietta, Ohio. purely as nearby advertisement issues gave option to statewide commercial matters, and as synthetic transportation networks similar to canals and railroads supplanted the river, did these residing to the north outline the Ohio as a boundary.

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River of Enterprise: The Commercial Origins of Regional Identity in the Ohio Valley, 1790-1850

"Gruenwald's publication will make an analogous contribution to historic wisdom of the Ohio Valley as Lewis Atherton's Frontier service provider did for our knowing of the mercantile Midwest within the mid-nineteenth century. .. . a finely crafted narrative that we could the reader take into account that the Ohio River continuously served extra as an artery, that's, a river of trade, than a dividing line or boundary.

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Clair the next year, resulted in nearly one thousand dead or wounded. The United States attempted to return to the policy of negotiating peace over the next two years. But with confidence inspired by earlier victories and British support from Canada, the Ohio Indians refused to consider anything less than a boundary between whites and Indians at the Ohio River itself. Marietta’s settlers lived under siege. During the winter of 1791, one short year after Wallcut’s rather uneventful stay, Indians attacked the Big Bottom, a settlement thirteen miles up the Muskingum River, killing twelve.

Apparently well versed in business practices, Lucy knew when to take cash and when to use credit. On 14 August Cushing recorded that “with Mrs. Woodbridge’s consent I sold Dan Harris the barrel of rum . . ” Lucy checked Cushing’s invoices and inventory records, and she took charge of the keys, books, and building when Cushing finished closing out the business. Lucy Woodbridge followed her husband to Ohio with some of their children in late September and arrived in Marietta in early November. As yet her husband owned no property.

Woodbridge’s consent I sold Dan Harris the barrel of rum . . ” Lucy checked Cushing’s invoices and inventory records, and she took charge of the keys, books, and building when Cushing finished closing out the business. Lucy Woodbridge followed her husband to Ohio with some of their children in late September and arrived in Marietta in early November. As yet her husband owned no property. Woodbridge rented a home and shop, keeping a constant eye out for property to buy. The move had cost him most of what he had, but Woodbridge remained confident that he could make profitable business deals and alliances in Marietta.

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