Castle to Castle by Louis-Ferdinand Céline; Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (intr.)

By Louis-Ferdinand Céline; Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (intr.)

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Mr. Manheim won the National Book Award in 1970 for this translation of Castle to Castle.

Before and during World War II, Céline supported certain Nazi ideas, and as the war ended, he fled to Germany and ultimately to Denmark—an experience recreated in Castle to Castle, North, and Rigadoon, all published by Penguin Books. He, who had said, "The truth of this world is death," died near Paris in 1961, dishonored yet recognized as one of the century's major writers. Ralph Manheim is distinguished for his translations of Céline, Günter Grass, and Hermann Hesse. Mr. Manheim won the National Book Award in 1970 for this translation of Castle to Castle.

His thesis on the nineteenth-century immunologist Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis was accepted at Rennes, and in 1928 he began general practice. In 1932, under the name Céline, he published Journey to the End of the Night—a summa of alienation and despair and a turning point in world literature because of its barbaric language, torrential imagery, and unrestrained bitterness. His second novel, Death on the Installment Plan (1936), was hardly less pessimistic. Before and during World War II, Céline supported certain Nazi ideas, and as the war ended, he fled to Germany and ultimately to Denmark—an experience recreated in Castle to Castle, North, and Rigadoon, all published by Penguin Books.

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