British Social Attitudes: The 24th Report (British Social by Alison Park, John Curtice, Katarina Thomson, Miranda

By Alison Park, John Curtice, Katarina Thomson, Miranda Phillips, Mark C Johnson, Elizabeth Clery

The British Social Attitudes survey sequence is performed by way of Britain's greatest self sustaining social study institute, the nationwide Centre for Social study. It presents an critical consultant to present political and social concerns in modern Britain. This, the twenty fourth file, describes the result of the latest nation-wide survey, together with research of the subsequent parts: nationwide identification; attitudes to 'new' forms of family members formations; attitudes to cohabitation and the rights of cohabitees; social welfare; and gender roles.

Show description

Read or Download British Social Attitudes: The 24th Report (British Social Attitudes Survey series) PDF

Best research books

The Basics of Social Research, 4th Edition

This thorough revision of Babbie's standard-setting e-book provides a succinct, undemanding creation to the sector of analysis equipment as practiced through social scientists. modern examples+such as terrorism, Alzheimer's affliction, anti-gay prejudice and schooling, and the legalization of marijuana make this Fourth version completely attention-grabbing because it introduces you to the "how-tos" and "whys" of social study tools.

Second Order Elliptic Integro-Differential Problems

The golf green functionality has performed a key position within the analytical method that during contemporary years has ended in very important advancements within the learn of stochastic strategies with jumps. during this learn word, the authors-both considered as top specialists within the box- gather a number of precious effects derived from the development of the fairway functionality and its estimates.

Consciousness and Self-Regulation: Advances in Research and Theory Volume 4

Within the Preface to the 3rd quantity, we defined the evolution of this sequence and the adjustments that experience taken position within the box because the first quantity seemed. The contents of the present quantity proceed the com­ mitment to a extensively dependent standpoint on study regarding con­ sciousness and self-regulation which used to be embodied within the past 3 volumes.

Additional resources for British Social Attitudes: The 24th Report (British Social Attitudes Survey series)

Sample text

2003). Solo living There has been a substantial rise in the number of people living alone in Britain over recent decades; by 2005, 17 per cent of adults aged over 16 were in oneperson households, compared to just eight per cent in 1971 (General Household Survey, 2005). Although many elderly people are forced to live on their own because of the death or infirmity of a partner, this recent increase is almost entirely accounted for by a rise in solo living among younger age groups. ). As Roseneil (2006) points out, it is precisely this age group which traditionally would be most expected to be married and having children.

Not only this, but theorists claim that gay men and lesbians have become a role model for heterosexuals in changing family life more generally (Roseneil and Budgeon, 2004). Symptomatically, these claims beg the question of how widespread this pioneering and proselytising role actually is (Duncan and Smith, 2006). For a number of years British Social Attitudes has asked questions about the rightness and wrongness of homosexuality, and these provide some initial answers. The following questions were asked in separate places in the questionnaire: Homosexual relations are always wrong [Agree strongly – Disagree strongly] … what about sexual relations between two adults of the same sex?

Although many elderly people are forced to live on their own because of the death or infirmity of a partner, this recent increase is almost entirely accounted for by a rise in solo living among younger age groups. ). As Roseneil (2006) points out, it is precisely this age group which traditionally would be most expected to be married and having children. , 2005). As we have seen, some of these people classified as ‘living alone’, particularly in younger age groups, will in fact be in ‘living apart together’ relationships New families?

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.00 of 5 – based on 12 votes